Despite showing her fall collection at the vacant Pearl River Mart space on Broadway in SoHo, and gleaning many of the prints from a private collection of Twenties meisen kimonos she found upstate, there was no discernible Asian theme in Tanya Taylor’s fall lineup. Rather, the impression it left was a happy collision of saturated color, rich prints and classic femininity handled in a very balanced, everyday wearable way.

“I don’t own a kimono and I’ve never been into Japanese culture,” said Taylor. “But these kimonos had the most incredible prints I’ve ever seen. It was the first time in [Japanese] history that women were wearing color on the outside of the garment and that felt powerful.” Color is Taylor’s thing and she used it well, taking a marigold-based, floral-and-bird print directly from one of the kimonos and using it on a long-sleeve V-neck dress, and working rich berry and black embroideries on a dress with a fitted top and paneled skirt. There was a pair of marigold sailor pants worn with a single-sleeve denim shirt with a ruffled neck. A black tailored coat had a hot-pink fur color and a gray, navy, orange and pink striped fur peplum.

Taylor is a purist when it comes to feminine clothes. What’s cool about her is she isn’t chasing “cool,” trying to go tomboy or street or edgy. Her stuff is girly but not precious or overly dainty — she tempers ruffles with lean silhouettes and treats embellishment with a measured hand, always anchoring the romance with a bit of weight. Case in point: the printed and cap-toe boots, and mules with chunky heels done with Coliac. It’s first collection Taylor will actually produce and sell.

By  on February 10, 2017

Despite showing her fall collection at the vacant Pearl River Mart space on Broadway in SoHo, and gleaning many of the prints from a private collection of Twenties meisen kimonos she found upstate, there was no discernible Asian theme in Tanya Taylor’s fall lineup. Rather, the impression it left was a happy collision of saturated color, rich prints and classic femininity handled in a very balanced, everyday wearable way.

“I don’t own a kimono and I’ve never been into Japanese culture,” said Taylor. “But these kimonos had the most incredible prints I’ve ever seen. It was the first time in [Japanese] history that women were wearing color on the outside of the garment and that felt powerful.” Color is Taylor’s thing and she used it well, taking a marigold-based, floral-and-bird print directly from one of the kimonos and using it on a long-sleeve V-neck dress, and working rich berry and black embroideries on a dress with a fitted top and paneled skirt. There was a pair of marigold sailor pants worn with a single-sleeve denim shirt with a ruffled neck. A black tailored coat had a hot-pink fur color and a gray, navy, orange and pink striped fur peplum.

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