Victoria Beckham didn’t make any loud political pronouncements with her fall runway show, a beautifully smart lineup of tailoring, softness and a modest celebration of the female form, but she wanted it to be known that she’d been thinking about the state of the world while designing. “I look at what’s happening in the world, and for me, it was not about show pieces,” said Beckham backstage. “It was about offering my woman really beautiful clothes…. The truth is, there has never been a time when it’s been more relevant to empower women.”

By using rich-but-grounded colors, like navy, oxblood, red and orange, and reworking classic men’s tailoring with square blazers and full-leg trousers, Beckham sent a subliminal message of strength. A woman in a sharply cut burgundy coat over fluid pants with a dashing foulard swishing under the coat is dressed to be taken seriously. Even rounder, curvier and more fluid stuff, such as a red chiffon dress under a navy blazer, a navy sweater with sculpted sleeves and tie-waisted trousers, and body-skimming jersey dresses in graphic swirled prints inspired by Paul Nash, had a determined air. Likewise, the impressive shoes: pointy flats with double buckles and sturdy boots — wedges and high heels. “You stomp in those shoes,” said Beckham. “You feel like a strong woman.” But a feminine one, too. The structured, vanity-case handbags, complete with built-in mirrors, were inspired by her Estée Lauder collaboration.

She also noted that she played up her own heritage in the lineup, via tartans, herringbones, English tailoring and a sophisticated school-uniform vibe. “It’s a very British collection, but with a global outlook,” she said. Asked how it was global, Beckham replied, “My business is global.”

By  on February 12, 2017

Victoria Beckham didn’t make any loud political pronouncements with her fall runway show, a beautifully smart lineup of tailoring, softness and a modest celebration of the female form, but she wanted it to be known that she’d been thinking about the state of the world while designing. “I look at what’s happening in the world, and for me, it was not about show pieces,” said Beckham backstage. “It was about offering my woman really beautiful clothes…. The truth is, there has never been a time when it’s been more relevant to empower women.”

By using rich-but-grounded colors, like navy, oxblood, red and orange, and reworking classic men’s tailoring with square blazers and full-leg trousers, Beckham sent a subliminal message of strength. A woman in a sharply cut burgundy coat over fluid pants with a dashing foulard swishing under the coat is dressed to be taken seriously. Even rounder, curvier and more fluid stuff, such as a red chiffon dress under a navy blazer, a navy sweater with sculpted sleeves and tie-waisted trousers, and body-skimming jersey dresses in graphic swirled prints inspired by Paul Nash, had a determined air. Likewise, the impressive shoes: pointy flats with double buckles and sturdy boots — wedges and high heels. “You stomp in those shoes,” said Beckham. “You feel like a strong woman.” But a feminine one, too. The structured, vanity-case handbags, complete with built-in mirrors, were inspired by her Estée Lauder collaboration.

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