Massimo Giorgetti said he employed a cinematic eye for fall. To showcase his approach, he organized the show like a movie with opening and end credits projected on a maxi screen. The actual film was the collection itself. Genre? Urban contemporary with a high dose of eclecticism.

Called “Heartbreaker,” it opened with a range of silk pieces, including a dress, a top and a miniskirt, decorated with maxi bows and a graphic pattern combining hearts and broken hearts, which looked cute and feminine. However, as in the best romantic comedies, the plots went darker with black leather used for an Eighties draped dress with a knot at the bodice and for color-blocked pants referencing car and motorbike racing matched with a coordinated knit peppered with ergonomic details.

The geometric patterns continued on red and black denim pants worn with a shirt printed with images developed in collaboration with Italian art magazine Flash Art and with a tweed coat, which was splashed with a black and white damier.

Anticipating the 10th birthday of his brand in September, Giorgetti also brought back elements of past collections, such as multicolor digitalized patterns; colorblocking — showed, for example, on a lively half-pink and half-camel maxi coat; tailoring — including a lovely tuxedo trimmed with tiny crystals — and the floral motifs, this time showing roses printed on a long puffer.

Even if the cinematic effect wasn’t that clear in the collection (the designer’s decision to credit all the people involved in the show was actually great), the lineup was injected with the kind of dynamism and energy Milan Fashion Week desperately needs. Along with designers who like to take some risks, as Giorgetti did.

By  on February 22, 2019

Massimo Giorgetti said he employed a cinematic eye for fall. To showcase his approach, he organized the show like a movie with opening and end credits projected on a maxi screen. The actual film was the collection itself. Genre? Urban contemporary with a high dose of eclecticism.

Called “Heartbreaker,” it opened with a range of silk pieces, including a dress, a top and a miniskirt, decorated with maxi bows and a graphic pattern combining hearts and broken hearts, which looked cute and feminine. However, as in the best romantic comedies, the plots went darker with black leather used for an Eighties draped dress with a knot at the bodice and for color-blocked pants referencing car and motorbike racing matched with a coordinated knit peppered with ergonomic details.

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