Alessandro Sartori is knocking the stuffing out of men’s tailoring. The collection he showed for Berluti was all about ease, drawing from the comfort of athleticwear with copious knits and tapered jogging pants.

Of course there were suits aplenty, but the Italian designer kept the pants narrow and stripped jackets of lining and shoulder pads, relying instead on precision pattern-cutting to create structure and definition.

“I like the juxtaposition between the light material, the light construction, made by hand, and the sharpness of the silhouette, and this is where I want to go with the brand,” Sartori explained backstage.

Guests arriving at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs were greeted by an installation of shoes suspended from oversize white balloons. The first looks on the runway were equally weightless: They included a dark green parka made from laminated silk poplin, and a glossy gray trench that turned out to be kangaroo skin.

Jackets and coats had a little more heft, with materials including a cashmere fabric woven through with leather, but they were worn casually with cardigans and sweaters instead of shirts.

The color palette was eclectic, with a rich palette of greens and grays complemented by shades inspired by Murano glass: dusty purple, sulfur yellow, terracotta and cobalt blue. For those whose tastes run more conservative, Berluti also showed its first all-black look.

By and  on January 25, 2015

Alessandro Sartori is knocking the stuffing out of men’s tailoring. The collection he showed for Berluti was all about ease, drawing from the comfort of athleticwear with copious knits and tapered jogging pants.

Of course there were suits aplenty, but the Italian designer kept the pants narrow and stripped jackets of lining and shoulder pads, relying instead on precision pattern-cutting to create structure and definition.

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