Yohji Yamamoto is another designer aiming to take his label back to basics this season. The Japanese designer noted Y-3, which he launched 12 years ago with German sportswear maker Adidas, had sometimes strayed too far into high-fashion territory.

“This time, I wanted to let this brand come back to my roots, so I gave the collection the title ‘Royal Air Force,’” he said backstage, explaining that military uniforms are designed, like sports clothes, for intense physical activity.

The flight theme was treated fairly literally, with men’s looks that were stripped down to essentials: A khaki Neoprene flight jacket, a navy boiler suit, or baggy sweatpants with patch and pocket details. These were broken up with the odd piece in a stylized camouflage print.

Yamamoto allowed himself more latitude with the women’s designs. Flight jackets were embellished with patches of shaggy gray fur, which was used all over for a capelet with the Adidas stripes shaved down the back.

Some of the plainer military-inspired looks, such as a cinched long black button-front coat, were quietly elegant, proving that function and style are not mutually exclusive.

By  on January 25, 2015

Yohji Yamamoto is another designer aiming to take his label back to basics this season. The Japanese designer noted Y-3, which he launched 12 years ago with German sportswear maker Adidas, had sometimes strayed too far into high-fashion territory.

“This time, I wanted to let this brand come back to my roots, so I gave the collection the title ‘Royal Air Force,’” he said backstage, explaining that military uniforms are designed, like sports clothes, for intense physical activity.

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