David Hart loves a theme. Last season he referenced the bright Bauhaus movement and before that he looked to spaghetti Westerns from the late 1960s.

This season he played within the same decade but trawled for ideas closer to home. Hart, whose father is a jazz musician, drew from photographer Francis Wolff, who documented artists from Blue Note Records, and album covers designed by Reid Miles. An all-black cast of models stood in various vignettes holding musical instruments or lounging at a deli table. They wore short-sleeve knits, plaid blazers and cropped trousers along with leather bombers and suede denim jackets — Hart said he produced more sportswear than usual this season.

On the other end of the spectrum, Hart amped up his more formal assortment with tuxedos and suits made from coated fabrics. While the collection was referential to the past, which is customary for Hart, the overall effect felt modern and more palatable for a wider swath of men’s wear customers.

By  on February 1, 2016

David Hart loves a theme. Last season he referenced the bright Bauhaus movement and before that he looked to spaghetti Westerns from the late 1960s.

This season he played within the same decade but trawled for ideas closer to home. Hart, whose father is a jazz musician, drew from photographer Francis Wolff, who documented artists from Blue Note Records, and album covers designed by Reid Miles. An all-black cast of models stood in various vignettes holding musical instruments or lounging at a deli table. They wore short-sleeve knits, plaid blazers and cropped trousers along with leather bombers and suede denim jackets — Hart said he produced more sportswear than usual this season.

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