John Smedley explored new territory for fall, using raw materials such as natural alpaca and British black sheep’s wool for the first time.

“We really wanted to do something that celebrated a fiber that is disregarded by the industry, which is the black sheep’s wool,” said Jess McGuire-Dudley, the brand’s marketing and design director. “The black sheep is normally culled from the herd because you can’t over dye” the wool.

The black sheep wool, which is closer to charcoal in color, featured in a number of pieces, including a boatneck cable-knit jumper and a wool cape that took 100 hours to knit.

Men’s wear and women’s wear were shown together and silhouettes were long, lean and androgynous.

“We’ve got a unisex collection, which is actually our most successful fashion line,” said McGuire-Dudley. “So what you’ll see going forward is actually the men’s and women’s merging a bit more together to make the most of that.”

Key pieces included an orange ribbed tunic top with a turtleneck and a black bouclé bomber.

By  on January 9, 2017

John Smedley explored new territory for fall, using raw materials such as natural alpaca and British black sheep’s wool for the first time.

“We really wanted to do something that celebrated a fiber that is disregarded by the industry, which is the black sheep’s wool,” said Jess McGuire-Dudley, the brand’s marketing and design director. “The black sheep is normally culled from the herd because you can’t over dye” the wool.

To continue reading this article...

load comments