John Elliott is growing up. The Los Angeles-based designer who has built his reputation as a leader in progressive streetwear over the past five years surprised everyone by opening his fall show with a sharply tailored suit. But pairing the look with a bright yellow nylon hoodie and a zip-up dress shirt brought it back into Elliott’s sensibility.

“The fact that I did tailoring is as far out of my comfort zone as I could have gone,” he said backstage before the show.

Other tailored elements, which were all manufactured in Japan, included topcoats and soft-shoulder blazers worn over snap tear-away warm-up pants.

The bulk of the show consisted of more-familiar silhouettes and treatments. Outerwear remains a hallmark of the brand with mini varsity jackets — reversible with removable sleeves — paneled nylon parkas and a sleek array of Perfecto jackets in purple and black leather.

The show also showcased a couple of collaborations, notably Nike Lab Vandal high-top sneakers that the designer updated by eliminating some padding and adding three straps.

One misstep was the use of ultra-skinny treated denim that felt dated — and not in a good way. The more relaxed silhouettes worked best with the collection’s casual vibe.

An impressive basketball court as the runway and a marching band to open and close the show helped reinforce that Elliott continues to be a major player on the men’s wear scene.

By  on February 1, 2017

John Elliott is growing up. The Los Angeles-based designer who has built his reputation as a leader in progressive streetwear over the past five years surprised everyone by opening his fall show with a sharply tailored suit. But pairing the look with a bright yellow nylon hoodie and a zip-up dress shirt brought it back into Elliott’s sensibility.

“The fact that I did tailoring is as far out of my comfort zone as I could have gone,” he said backstage before the show.

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