Pal Zileri’s newly minted creative director Rocco Iannone linked his first collection for the brand to the company’s roots in Italy’s Veneto region. Models walked the runway as images of storied sites in the region scrolled in the background, from the 17th-century Villa Valmarana ai Nani, ensconced in an expansive historical park and boasting frescoes by Giambattista and Giandomenico Tiepolo, to the Saint Celso Church, erected in the 4th century but rebuilt in the 11th century. There were many references to the architecture of the locations seen in the shapes and colors of the clothes.

Iannone, a Giorgio Armani alum, showed a sophisticated collection, designed with confidence. He re-elaborated the brand’s core tailored suits, updating them with on-trend elements such as check jackets worn over corduroy pants in soft pastel colors. The latter were also combined with embroidered damask jackets. Double-breasted jackets were cropped and boxy, and worn under long and roomy check coats with furry necks. Materials were precious, including cashmere and alpaca, and textures were rich. Corduroy in a twill weave came in a rusty color on a cropped jacket with toggle clasps and leather patches on the elbows, or in a dark gold-yellow hue as a buttoned vest with a wool neckline.

During a preview, Iannone said that he wished to “remove the bourgeois and conservative patina” from the more traditional looks and improve the brand’s merchandise mix, adding knitwear, outerwear and denim, with softer and more romantic silhouettes. He succeeded: The looks telegraphed ease and nonchalance.

By  on January 15, 2018

Pal Zileri’s newly minted creative director Rocco Iannone linked his first collection for the brand to the company’s roots in Italy’s Veneto region. Models walked the runway as images of storied sites in the region scrolled in the background, from the 17th-century Villa Valmarana ai Nani, ensconced in an expansive historical park and boasting frescoes by Giambattista and Giandomenico Tiepolo, to the Saint Celso Church, erected in the 4th century but rebuilt in the 11th century. There were many references to the architecture of the locations seen in the shapes and colors of the clothes.

Iannone, a Giorgio Armani alum, showed a sophisticated collection, designed with confidence. He re-elaborated the brand’s core tailored suits, updating them with on-trend elements such as check jackets worn over corduroy pants in soft pastel colors. The latter were also combined with embroidered damask jackets. Double-breasted jackets were cropped and boxy, and worn under long and roomy check coats with furry necks. Materials were precious, including cashmere and alpaca, and textures were rich. Corduroy in a twill weave came in a rusty color on a cropped jacket with toggle clasps and leather patches on the elbows, or in a dark gold-yellow hue as a buttoned vest with a wool neckline.

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