In a men’s wear season that is shaping up as dark and political, Christopher Bevans was no exception.

His sixth collection for Dyne was intended to be “a tool against hate, discrimination and inequality,” a sentiment he illustrated through Mad Max-style eye makeup on the models. “The dark shadows over the eyes allow them to see through the dark,” he said backstage before the show. “We’re trying to bring positivity through fashion.”

Politics aside, Dyne’s athletic DNA prevailed, with a strong outerwear offering that ranged from utility jackets to a sleek cropped trenchcoat. Bevans also collaborated this season with the Italian animal-friendly brand Save the Duck on a variety of puffers and vests.

That same ethical outlook shone through in the faux fur car coats that added a touch of sophistication.

But the collection had more than just outerwear. Color-blocked tracksuits, fitted blazers and water-based performance Ts kept the technical aspect at the forefront.

Bevans also surprised with his first looks for women, which blended seamlessly with the rest of the lineup.

By  on February 6, 2018

In a men’s wear season that is shaping up as dark and political, Christopher Bevans was no exception.

His sixth collection for Dyne was intended to be “a tool against hate, discrimination and inequality,” a sentiment he illustrated through Mad Max-style eye makeup on the models. “The dark shadows over the eyes allow them to see through the dark,” he said backstage before the show. “We’re trying to bring positivity through fashion.”

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