Looking to reconnect with creativity on a pure, raw level, a lot of designers have been turning to children for help this season, handing over the pencil and paper to see what they come out with on a given topic.

At Acne, it wasn’t just a case of slapping a cute doodle on a T-shirt. Instead, Jonny Johansson looked to translate the naive constructions of kids’ drawings into a real wardrobe.

“It wasn’t child labor, I think they had a lot of fun,” quipped the designer backstage. “What was interesting was this experimental mood, stripes weren’t straight, silhouettes were kind of crooked….”

The designer joined two panels with one seam and used it as the framework, such as on a series of cool striped floppy knits in blanket-style striped fabrics and monochrome designs in purist rounded forms. Super cute colored sweaters were embroidered with fluffy rockets and stars, their lines breaking off as if the artist had become distracted and gone off to chase a butterfly.

A lot of the pants came stripped of hardware and belts, while the kick flares with knife-edge pleats underscored the fun retro vibe.

Standouts included a duffle coat with snaps in lieu of toggles, covered in a mossy green and blue jacquard that was also used as accent panels elsewhere in the collection.

“Grown-up” leather shoes completed the look, with the idea of kids playing dress up, and superfine chains were draped around some of the looks, like gold threads.

What started out as child’s play resulted in a quirky new spin on minimalism.

By  on January 21, 2018

Looking to reconnect with creativity on a pure, raw level, a lot of designers have been turning to children for help this season, handing over the pencil and paper to see what they come out with on a given topic.

At Acne, it wasn’t just a case of slapping a cute doodle on a T-shirt. Instead, Jonny Johansson looked to translate the naive constructions of kids’ drawings into a real wardrobe.

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