For objects designated as a “uniform,” military clothes have the odd habit of being anything but, as Andrea Rosso discovered for MYAR, his army upcycling label.

What strikes most in these racks of olive and martial neutrals is how naturally the utility component becomes a civilian asset. Rossi stated his desire to reframe these wartime outfits into something less violent; he mostly succeeds.

“Vintage is sustainable. There is no production, we don’t invent anything, we fall in love and customize for today,” Rosso said at his presentation, where racks were filled with reinterpreted U.S. Army and Navy aesthetics: orange flecked chocolate chip camouflage, the hand-picked T-shirts with unit and base pride logos and patchworks of differently faded battle dress. High-tops and low canvas sneakers with three top hooks to aid lacing were a tie up with Superga, which were the only repeated elements in a lineup full of one-of-a-kind garments.

Freshest were the bomber jackets cut from padded quilted linings, a U.S. Navy button-down shirt revisited with Western piping, trousers with lurid orange piping along the outer seam and a dip-dyed ombré field jacket.

By  on January 22, 2018

For objects designated as a “uniform,” military clothes have the odd habit of being anything but, as Andrea Rosso discovered for MYAR, his army upcycling label.

What strikes most in these racks of olive and martial neutrals is how naturally the utility component becomes a civilian asset. Rossi stated his desire to reframe these wartime outfits into something less violent; he mostly succeeds.

To continue reading this article...

load comments