Following on Fila’s big-bang hook-up with Fendi, and its first runway show in Milan in September, the debut collection of the brand’s new premium-positioned label with a sustainable bent, Fila Fjord, headed by Copenhagen-based designer Astrid Andersen, played out as a pared down, minimalist spin on suburban normcore, with a deliberate downplaying of logos.

The presentation, held at the Palazzo Borghese, felt subversive, with the clothes placed on plain white mannequins, accentuating the line’s genderless, ageless vibe, and the rich decor — chandeliers included — muffled in recycled plastic. The soundtrack to “Twin Peaks” gently twanged in the background.

Said Elgar Johnson, fashion director of British GQ Style, who also worked on the collection: “Because we were showing streetwear and because of the way people cast now, I think you can be very easily tricked into thinking that’s who should be wearing it, so we wanted to keep it as plain as possible. These clothes are for anyone.”

The main idea, he added, was to explore where streetwear is headed. “Because the market is so saturated with it, everyone’s going to be experimenting with what happens next,” he said.

For Andersen that meant developing clothes that have a direction, “and not just building a frame around the logo,” with this idea of creating a wardrobe, slowing down, “building pieces meant to last for longer.

“The ethos, a lot of the inspiration, comes from my Scandinavian background, maybe you’re a bit more toned down and consistent in that wardrobe,” she said.

Known for her high-end streetwear infused with elements such as fur and lace, the designer even included a couple of sporty intarsia mink coats, wholesaling at around 6,000 euros. “For me, a fur coat is the most sustainable in terms of it being passed down through generations, and it completely goes back into the earth,” she said.

Spanning a mix of men’s, women’s and unisex clothing, the collection went from a jersey line in eco-sourced materials to merino-wool sweaters, cool color-blocked Nineties-style track jackets and gray wool jumpsuits with interesting details. The palette included mustard, gray, moss green and mauve, with a shadowy tree photo print patterning some of the looks.

Footwear included a round sandal version of the Fila Disruptor, which accentuated the line’s subtle retro “ugly” vibe, and a hiking-inspired sneaker, paired with a sport-luxe knitted cashmere bottom.

With Fila looking to create a line that feels more elevated, and to position the label in a new market, the plan is to deliver two collections per year, depending on how it performs, Andersen said, adding that the line will not be sold through the retail system of Fila, but will be handed over to sales agents worldwide “to be positioned differently.”

By  on January 11, 2019

Following on Fila’s big-bang hook-up with Fendi, and its first runway show in Milan in September, the debut collection of the brand’s new premium-positioned label with a sustainable bent, Fila Fjord, headed by Copenhagen-based designer Astrid Andersen, played out as a pared down, minimalist spin on suburban normcore, with a deliberate downplaying of logos.

The presentation, held at the Palazzo Borghese, felt subversive, with the clothes placed on plain white mannequins, accentuating the line’s genderless, ageless vibe, and the rich decor — chandeliers included — muffled in recycled plastic. The soundtrack to “Twin Peaks” gently twanged in the background.

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