Je t’aime, Paris!

This city may be gripped by anxiety about what the gilets jaunes, and the criminals infiltrating them, might do next, but there are still many who adore Paris. Alexandre Mattiussi gave Paris a hug with a collection of colorful coats, knits and tailored separates inspired by the beauty of the city’s bourgeoisie.

The show, which included more women’s looks than ever, unfolded at the grand Théâtre National de Chaillot at Place du Trocadéro. At the finale, Mattiussi tugged open the curtains, revealing the Eiffel Tower in all its splendor through the soaring glass windows.

“Paris is still a beautiful city, and I wanted to bring that sense of beauty to the show,” said Mattiussi, adding that he wanted to honor the bourgeoisie, and the importance of being polite, well-dressed and visiting the grandparents. It’s about time the oft-maligned bourgeoisie caught a break, non?

The colors, he said, were inspired by garden flowers and Ladurée macarons, while the generous proportions came from clothing that’s borrowed from grandparents’ closets. It was youthful, charming and chic: Coats came long or short, wide-shouldered or more fitted, tailored or languid in shades of cream, bottle green, emerald, mint and fleshy pink.

Oversize knits were abloom with big pixelated flowers, while pink or white V-necks were layered over ties — ties! How very old world. Tailoring was slouchy and languid for men and women alike, with wide-cut or fitted, cropped trousers and jackets in houndstooth, check or herringbone.

Fedoras and pocket watch chains rounded out the image of grand-père, and his heirs, on their way to Sunday lunch. Long live the bourgeoisie and its discreet charms.

By  on January 17, 2019

Je t’aime, Paris!

This city may be gripped by anxiety about what the gilets jaunes, and the criminals infiltrating them, might do next, but there are still many who adore Paris. Alexandre Mattiussi gave Paris a hug with a collection of colorful coats, knits and tailored separates inspired by the beauty of the city’s bourgeoisie.

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