A rock vibe infused this collection, which was filled with billowing shirts and jackets, languid robes and jacquards on the one hand, and black leather trousers, T-shirts and chunky boots on the other.

Creative director Sébastien Meunier said he had in mind the decade before the rise of the Antwerp Six, when the Belgian city was a hotbed of artists, galleries and musicians. “They were so exciting,” he said backstage. “They were really like anarchists, punky, etc., and they were trying a lot of stuff. [Artists] were really making a strange mix, and everything was free.

“At this moment, the Antwerp Six appeared, and Ann Demeulemeester said there’s no good rock music without anarchy, and there’s no good fashion without anarchy and rebellion,” continued Meunier, who wanted to show for fall “a more tough way, a more punk way that we also have in our blood — something more rock.”

This he brought across artfully and effectively, like with the loosely belted pink silk robe worn over navy trousers and under a long brown fur coat. Or the strapless, flowy black dress paired with black leather pants and lace-up boots.

By mixing the Ann Demeulemeester label’s traditional tailoring, black-and-white color code and silks with retro references, Meunier succeeded in bringing the brand forward.

By  on January 18, 2019

A rock vibe infused this collection, which was filled with billowing shirts and jackets, languid robes and jacquards on the one hand, and black leather trousers, T-shirts and chunky boots on the other.

Creative director Sébastien Meunier said he had in mind the decade before the rise of the Antwerp Six, when the Belgian city was a hotbed of artists, galleries and musicians. “They were so exciting,” he said backstage. “They were really like anarchists, punky, etc., and they were trying a lot of stuff. [Artists] were really making a strange mix, and everything was free.

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