Some of the ingredients might have been old, but this highly energetic show, in its on-point evolution on the brand’s commitment to conscious design incorporating pre-loved garments, felt like a fresh departure for design duo Emma and Saif Bakir.

Their protagonist: an apocalyptic raver who’d borrowed time-worn pieces from his dad’s wardrobe, his skinny latex pants in a crumpled, marbelized print adding a youth kick to the boxy tailoring and frayed knits.

Everything had a destroyed, punky allure, including the opening dark green coat with large shoulders and slashed sleeves, with layered over it a deconstructed vest in a patchwork of knitwear motifs, some turned inside out, and a huge padded scarf knotted in a bow at the side.

A hybrid suit pant cut from two similar checked sartorial fabrics joined with a diagonal scar crossing the upper legs was uber cool.

Underscoring the Frankenstein vibe were the great experimental knits — the designers were finalists for the International Woolmark Prize 2019 — layered over tailoring, from the small vests veiled in tulle-like layers, to deconstructed pieces that looked like they’d had giant chunks taken out of them, “Jaws” style. Case in point, the winning look in a collection brimming with subculture buzz and sensuality: a funnel neck cable knit in full decomposition, layered over a double-breasted green jacket with the sleeves slit open to reveal a yellow crushed velvet shirt, with marbleized yellow latex leggings finishing the look.

By  on January 15, 2019

Some of the ingredients might have been old, but this highly energetic show, in its on-point evolution on the brand’s commitment to conscious design incorporating pre-loved garments, felt like a fresh departure for design duo Emma and Saif Bakir.

Their protagonist: an apocalyptic raver who’d borrowed time-worn pieces from his dad’s wardrobe, his skinny latex pants in a crumpled, marbelized print adding a youth kick to the boxy tailoring and frayed knits.

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