Prints featured heavily in men’s wear designer Philippe Paubert’s fall collection for Emanuel Ungaro, which isn’t surprising given his history with the brand. Paubert, who took over men’s wear at Emanuel Ungaro in 2016 (the division represents 35 percent of the label’s revenue) worked with the print-loving designer himself from 1992 to 2000.

Polka dots, an Ungaro signature, were spotted on shirts, while evening jackets sported a Seventies peacock print on the inside of the garment. The Persian rugs found in posh Parisian hotels on the Right Bank of the Seine inspired ethnic prints in autumnal hues. A tiny white daisy-shaped pin was placed in buttonholes, a reference to the house’s famed hand-drawn daisy-print dresses of the Seventies.

Comfort is key for the Ungaro man: light jersey jackets felt soft on the skin, but retained a perfect structure because of their tuxedo construction. “Ungaro used to say he wanted the male silhouette to be liquid,” said Paubert, a term that meant confortable and functional. “Not a banker who is a victim of his own clothes.”

By  on January 19, 2019

Prints featured heavily in men’s wear designer Philippe Paubert’s fall collection for Emanuel Ungaro, which isn’t surprising given his history with the brand. Paubert, who took over men’s wear at Emanuel Ungaro in 2016 (the division represents 35 percent of the label’s revenue) worked with the print-loving designer himself from 1992 to 2000.

Polka dots, an Ungaro signature, were spotted on shirts, while evening jackets sported a Seventies peacock print on the inside of the garment. The Persian rugs found in posh Parisian hotels on the Right Bank of the Seine inspired ethnic prints in autumnal hues. A tiny white daisy-shaped pin was placed in buttonholes, a reference to the house’s famed hand-drawn daisy-print dresses of the Seventies.

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