Speaking a couple of days before his brand’s first show in Paris, Jannik Wikkelso Davidsen confided it proved tricky to find a suitable venue for his planned set design, as he needed somewhere with a 10- to 15-meter-high ceiling. The result didn’t disappoint: a dystopian Denmark greeted guests at the Han Kjobenhavn show on Tuesday night, complete with towering concrete blocks and structures seemingly made of urban junk, such as a cluster of television aerials.

The theme of the collection was “Fairytale Denmark,” riffing on the idealized perception of the country by foreigners. Davidsen’s Denmark, inspired by his upbringing in suburban Copenhagen, is fierce and gritty: outdated-looking “Visit Denmark” sweatshirts were paired with baggy trousers and colorful track pants, worn by scowling youths who looked straight out of an underground club.

The designs were based around items Nineties teenagers would steal from their parents’ closet and match with their own: a football jersey was seen peeking out from underneath an oversize dad suit, leather and shearling jackets looked clearly borrowed, especially when paired with bright sweatpants or embellished jeans.

Expected Nineties nods — bare midriffs, plaid jackets, XXL knit jumpers — felt fresh thanks to clever styling, and the whole collection had a grunge vibe, without becoming too gimmicky. Even the colors were vintage: mauve track pants, a dark green vinyl jacket and a rust corduroy overcoat looked straight out of a thrift shop. A performance by Danish musician Loverman closed the event, leaving guests excited to see what’s next for the cool Danish brand.

By  on January 16, 2019

Speaking a couple of days before his brand’s first show in Paris, Jannik Wikkelso Davidsen confided it proved tricky to find a suitable venue for his planned set design, as he needed somewhere with a 10- to 15-meter-high ceiling. The result didn’t disappoint: a dystopian Denmark greeted guests at the Han Kjobenhavn show on Tuesday night, complete with towering concrete blocks and structures seemingly made of urban junk, such as a cluster of television aerials.

The theme of the collection was “Fairytale Denmark,” riffing on the idealized perception of the country by foreigners. Davidsen’s Denmark, inspired by his upbringing in suburban Copenhagen, is fierce and gritty: outdated-looking “Visit Denmark” sweatshirts were paired with baggy trousers and colorful track pants, worn by scowling youths who looked straight out of an underground club.

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