Andrea Rosso focused on repurposing the internal lining of military jackets this season, upcycling it into other forms. “We call this collection ‘Re_enforce’ because we give strength to something that did not exist before,” he said, citing as an example parka liners that became bombers.

“Every product is unique because it’s vintage,” continued Rosso, who chooses deadstock with which to work from warehouses. “We love to unstitch, restitch and to give another view of the garments.”

He sliced Belgian camouflage jackets in two, turning one part inside out before reconstructing the halves together and adding pockets for symmetry. Sweatshirts were reconstituted, too.

U.S. Air Force sweatpants were given the Myar logo on one side, with some dyed in pink, orange or light blue. Swiss military camouflage was dyed light blue, and on the jacket’s back a swatch of the original material was sewn on.

“This is somehow maintaining the past, but with a modern view of it,” Rosso said. He reworked numerous types of uniform pieces, such overpants, with pockets and reflective touches, to become urban trousers.

For the first season, Myar created various sized bags from scrap materials. “We tend to give a second life to everything that we can,” Rosso said.

And for the third year, the brand is collaborating with Superga on high- and low-top sneakers.

The Myar style — and ethos — chimes with the times.

By  on January 20, 2019

Andrea Rosso focused on repurposing the internal lining of military jackets this season, upcycling it into other forms. “We call this collection ‘Re_enforce’ because we give strength to something that did not exist before,” he said, citing as an example parka liners that became bombers.

“Every product is unique because it’s vintage,” continued Rosso, who chooses deadstock with which to work from warehouses. “We love to unstitch, restitch and to give another view of the garments.”

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