McCartney’s women’s pre-fall and men’s fall collections were inspired by the 4K-digitized, rereleased version of “Yellow Submarine,” and were meant to complement each other. In an interview, she described them “effortless clothes” with influences from Savile Row, her environmental crusade and, of course, The Beatles.

Having watched the newest version of “Yellow Submarine” as an adult, McCartney said she took the animated film a whole different way. “The last time, I saw it through the eyes of a child,” she said of the 1969 film that starred her father Paul, and the rest of the Fab Four. “This time, it blew my mind. I looked at it as a fashion designer and a creative person.”

Wowed by the film’s variety of content, hand-drawn animations and inclusive messages, McCartney wove those elements into both collections, which were unique to her — and fun as anything.

She described the men’s as “more trippy,” than the women’s, and created an “All Together Now” capsule based on the song and the illustrations from the film. An embroidered jacket showcased images of the band and graphics from the film, while the pop art portraits came as intarsias on regenerated cashmere knits.

Sweatshirts and gray mélange knits were embroidered with “All Together Now” in multiple languages, a message, she said, that resonates now more than ever. A yellow coat recalled the legendary submarine, while a long navy one was covered in badges featuring The Beatles and Stella McCartney signatures.

McCartney’s heritage also shone through in velvet suits, jackets and coats with epaulets, and other toppers covered in checks. Sticking to her green guns, McCartney also added a plant print to the lineup and a Breton shirt made from recycled cotton, in addition to organic cotton and other vegetarian, sustainable materials.

By  on January 18, 2019

McCartney’s women’s pre-fall and men’s fall collections were inspired by the 4K-digitized, rereleased version of “Yellow Submarine,” and were meant to complement each other. In an interview, she described them “effortless clothes” with influences from Savile Row, her environmental crusade and, of course, The Beatles.

Having watched the newest version of “Yellow Submarine” as an adult, McCartney said she took the animated film a whole different way. “The last time, I saw it through the eyes of a child,” she said of the 1969 film that starred her father Paul, and the rest of the Fab Four. “This time, it blew my mind. I looked at it as a fashion designer and a creative person.”

To continue reading this article...

load comments