Gentle rebellion, nonchalance and self-confidence were recurring terms newly appointed creative director Walter Chiapponi mentioned at Tod’s T Club “of modern leaders of eccentricity,” as he revisited the brand’s codes keeping its “classic elegance and Italian good taste in mind,” he said.

This translated into “the chic man’s typical week suitcase,” said Diego Della Valle, Tod’s chief executive officer.

That man wears jeans with blazers and the brand’s Winter Gommino — suede, calfskin and sheepskin boots — or the new loafers with chunky stitching and thick rubber soles, a roomy waxed fabric and leather backpack slung over his shoulder. “Functionality meets free-spirited attitude,” said Chiapponi, who heads an in-house creative team and oversees all Tod’s projects, including the capsules Della Valle launched in 2018. “He is like an orchestra director,” the entrepreneur said.

With the goal to further establish Tod’s as a lifestyle brand, the models at the T Club wore urban designs as well as more relaxed looks for a leisurely stroll in Saint Moritz or Cortina. Polo knits replaced shirts; a trenchcoat was enriched with leather trims and saddlery; an archival velvet driving coat was revisited through a military inspiration and bombers showed pockets inspired by the hunting world. The sneaker became “bourgeois,” with cashmere uppers, and all was “worn with nonchalance,” Chiapponi emphasized. The designer also updated the T Timeless archival logo from the Eighties and Nineties as an enameled buckle on loafers or closure on bags. The color palette ranged from camel, tobacco and khaki to white, black and denim blue, with touches of bright red.

Presented at Villa Necchi’s winter garden, the T Club models propped by the bar reflected Tod’s luxury vocation and showed that it does not have to be all work and no play.

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