The design trio at Études turned to the Nineties, when music television channels arrived in France, allowing youth to discover international pop stars from the comfort of their couches. Here, through fashion week’s online platform, today’s couch-bound fashion followers were served up a collection of handsome, updated styles, with an added sheen of sophistication thanks to the muted autumnal palette and noble fabrics. Sensing a need for both comfort and style, they mixed handsome tailoring and silky bombers with ample, shadow-plaid pajama ensembles; sleek puffer coats of all lengths; a velvet tracksuit combo, and boxy workwear jackets.

The pattern on a leopard-print cardigan was tweaked for modernity, making for a sleeker feel than its grunge-era thrift-store predecessor, while MTV’s “Beavis and Butt-Head” featured prominently on the back of dark, silk shirts. A collaboration with Martine Syms yielded messages on a purple hoodie with cutout shoulders: Go Slow.

Last season’s street stroll evolved into a dance set — of a modern sort — improvised, performed by amateurs in everyday urban settings.

“It says something about what we want to express now, what fashion is about, what youth is about and what culture is about,” said Aurélien Arbet, a third of the trio. The designers looked to interiors when designing the collection, with references to home furnishings like silky sheets, though they felt the need to push the lineup into the outside world.

The performers give it their all. A woman in boxy trousers and an oversize fleece bomber flailed her arms in front of the concrete base of a modern building, while a silky-haired head-banger in a chunky knit sweater bounced around on cobblestones. The film closed with spin in a laundromat for the ultimate, real-life feel — like the collection, spirited but anchored in reality.

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