Missing live fashion shows, Boramy Viguier doubled down on his quest to exploit the full potential of the video format, and sent his models off on a fruitless run — moving, in place, with the sole purpose of showing the clothing in movement. Models in suits or long, tunic-like windbreakers — slit on the sides for added freedom — ran in slow motion, offering peeks of lightweight tracksuit bottoms or a flash of brightly colored brocade pattern with dragons.

“I like seeing people run in the street — catching a bus — it makes for incredible looks, it adds to the silhouette,” he said, noting the details offered by slow motion scenes in films like the “Matrix,” or scientific documentaries showing a bullet piercing through an apple.

The format proved highly effective, and well-suited to the designer’s eclectic aesthetic — with zoom-in shots to reveal further details.

He drew together a mishmash of references — loosely cut plaid suits, stiff dragon brocade tops and bottoms, ultralight windbreakers and tracksuit bottoms, adding neat mushroom labels on sleeves — not the hallucinogenic variety, he offered, in case you wondered. Ties were built into the collection, flattened out to add stripes to loose shirts, and repurposed into coiled neck accessories.

Viguer has a knack for steering his audience somewhere they’ve never quite been before — and that doesn’t seem to really exist — twisting the familiar until it becomes something new, often more interesting. Hanging strips of hair from synthetic wigs were attached to rough cords, and offered as an accessory to affix to a belt loop. Furoshiki shoes with Vibram soles enclosed the foot with folded fabric, fastened with Velcro.

“I don’t want to create things that even look real — I prefer looks that question things,” he said, adding that it’s not necessarily an answer he’s after, rather the exploration.

There were plenty of answers in this collection, though, especially for an industry casting around for ideas on how to insert notions of circularity into the design process. The designer also introduced his 1/1 One of a Kind collection, a series of unique pieces using different fabrics for a set of standard silhouettes.