“Digital despair,” was how the designer described the current moment, with so many reliant on speedy communications, strangers’ digital judgment and opinions, and virtual relationships and tribes.

Chalayan said the collection — an elegant mix of streetwear, Middle and Far Eastern dress — was a reaction to that, and a signal to slow down.

The piece that best reflected his mood was a cobalt blue sweater with the black silhouette of a plant sprouting on the front. What appeared to be a text message conversation appeared in different colors on the front.

“They’re embroidered text messages. Each person has to wait for an embroidered response. It’s time to slow down,” said the designer.

Silhouettes recalled the East: Some trousers had long swooshing panels, recalling the look of a shalwar kameez, while sculpted jacket sleeves took their cues from the kimono.

Other shapes were more spare, as in a white blouse with a triangular fold at the front held in place by a single button; a pair of crinkly trousers with buckle and strap details, and hoodie jackets with subtle leaf jacquards or prints, a wink to the natural world and an antidote to speed and stress.

See More From the London 2018 Men’s Spring Collections:

Stella McCartney Screens Men’s Wear Short Film at 16th-century Pub: Steven Tyler, Steve Coogan were among the guests at the Tudor-era watering hole.

Charles Jeffrey Men’s Spring 2018: A riotous cast of characters, unified in their theatricality and Jeffrey’s joyous treatment of his theme: debauchery.

Cottweiler feat. Reebok Men’s Spring 2018: Dainty and Cottrell looked to the optimism and escapism of off-grid desert communities for spring.

What We Wear Men’s Spring 2018:  Tinie Tempah fused the brand’s minimalist aesthetic with a sportier one for spring.

Wales Bonner Men’s Spring 2018: This focused yet subdued collection saw Grace Wales Bonner musing on a “blue mood.”

Christopher Raeburn Men’s Spring 2018: There was a lightness and transparency to Christopher Raeburn’s signature practical silhouettes.

By  on June 11, 2017

“Digital despair,” was how the designer described the current moment, with so many reliant on speedy communications, strangers’ digital judgment and opinions, and virtual relationships and tribes.

Chalayan said the collection — an elegant mix of streetwear, Middle and Far Eastern dress — was a reaction to that, and a signal to slow down.

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