Luke Tadashi and Tommy Nowels, who design Bristol Los Angeles, drew from early childhood fashion recollections for spring.

“My first fashion memories were going to the supermarket with my mother and looking at Slam magazine,” Tadashi said. “The magazine featured a mix of NBA and urban street culture and those Rocawear and Sean John ads really had an impact on me.”

 The homage to streetwear in the early 2000s translated into an array of updated denim tracksuits that featured boxy, elongated track jackets and baggy sweatpants with snap closures on the sides for that retro Adidas feel.

Skater-inspired oversize corduroy pants cut on the bias provided interesting textures and volumes while celebrating the early Aughts. The use of Cupro fabric in half-zip tops and shorts provided the feminine touch that is also part of Bristol’s DNA. 

The collection did a good job of identifying a core message for Bristol and moving streetwear beyond its too-long obsession with the Nineties. And that’s a welcome change.

See More From the Men’s 2018 Collections:

Head of State Men’s Spring 2018: Taofeek Abijako, who just turned 19, looked to West African artists for his collection. 

Krammer & Stoudt Men’s Spring 2018: The collection had a casual Baja feel but also included a tuxedo for the first time. 

Bristol Los Angeles Men’s Spring 2018: The collection offered a unique take on streetwear from the Aughts.

Wood House Men’s Spring 2018: Julian Woodhouse presented a playful collection to escape from the taxing political climate.

David Hart Men’s Spring 2018: The designer referenced Cuba for his retro-themed, colorful collection.

Valentino Men’s Spring 2018: Pierpaolo Piccioli’s casual lineup was all about self-expression.

Y/Project Men’s Spring 2018: The collection was more merch-friendly without losing any of the edge.

Cédric Charlier Men’s Spring 2018: Called “Playtime,” the starting point for the coed collection was a sculpture by Todd Knopke.

Balenciaga Men’s Spring 2018: Demna Gvasalia’s collection was an ode to Sunday in the park with Dad.

By  on July 10, 2017

Luke Tadashi and Tommy Nowels, who design Bristol Los Angeles, drew from early childhood fashion recollections for spring.

“My first fashion memories were going to the supermarket with my mother and looking at Slam magazine,” Tadashi said. “The magazine featured a mix of NBA and urban street culture and those Rocawear and Sean John ads really had an impact on me.”

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