David Hart didn’t stray too far out of his wheelhouse this season, offering up a colorful, retro-themed collection of tailored clothing and sportswear. This time around the line was inspired by tourism to Cuba, as evidenced by the tropical-print camp shirts, boldly striped sport coats and knits and brightly hued suits.

Hart said he hasn’t had a chance yet to visit the island nation (and he might not get to given President Trump’s reimposition of restrictions on tourism to the country) but instead based his collection on Cuban references he found in “cinema, music and photos.”

Sharply tailored slim-cut suits were offered in rainbow hues that included bright red, lime green, burnt orange and milk chocolate-brown. They were complemented by a more subdued palette of navy and burgundy — all serving to showcase Hart’s tailoring expertise.

“I love color,” Hart said. “So I took great earth tones and put them together with muted colors.”

The bright tones were also visible in the more casual part of the collection, with yellow, pink and cream linen shirts that looked like they belonged on a warm summer beach.

Hart showcased two women’s looks at his presentation — “My background was in women’s wear,” the designer said, “so it was fun to show [a complement] to the David Hart guy.” The girls wore Hollywood high-waisted pleated trousers with tied-up Cuban-printed shirts.

Given retro references and prints were all over the European runways, Hart’s collection fit right in with the major trends of the season.

By  on July 10, 2017

David Hart didn’t stray too far out of his wheelhouse this season, offering up a colorful, retro-themed collection of tailored clothing and sportswear. This time around the line was inspired by tourism to Cuba, as evidenced by the tropical-print camp shirts, boldly striped sport coats and knits and brightly hued suits.

Hart said he hasn’t had a chance yet to visit the island nation (and he might not get to given President Trump’s reimposition of restrictions on tourism to the country) but instead based his collection on Cuban references he found in “cinema, music and photos.”

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