Boris Bidjan Saberi delivered a strong collection full of massive chunky knits, familiar layering techniques and colors spanning an array of earth tones that brought to mind explorers in an urban jungle.

The German designer first mined his archive of military garments. “I had the idea to create a look that is basically a camouflage,” explained Bidjan Saberi. “Like one garment of this, the other garment here and these nonmatching greens together. It would look like a camouflage on one person — without being a [true] camouflage.”

The resulting effect was lighter and more lyrical than in past seasons, due not just to the deconstructed camouflage, but also to the layered pieces being somewhat less tough-seeming than before.

The opening look included a light brown knitted cape with huge stitches over a green shirt and darker brown undergarment, for instance. Another paired a brown leather shirt-jacket with shorts of a darker hue.

There was a new overall style that Bidjan Saberi described as a cross between a kimono, karate uniform and gabardine.

Orange was the only shock of color in the collection. And though it nodded to the lining of old bomber jackets, here it was devoid of a bellicose vibe and instead infused a burst of positive energy.

See More From the Men’s 2018 Collections:

Valentino Men’s Spring 2018: Pierpaolo Piccioli’s casual lineup was all about self-expression.

Y/Project Men’s Spring 2018: The collection was more merch-friendly without losing any of the edge.

Cédric Charlier Men’s Spring 2018: Called “Playtime,” the starting point for the coed collection was a sculpture by Todd Knopke.

Balenciaga Men’s Spring 2018: Demna Gvasalia’s collection was an ode to Sunday in the park with Dad

Jil Sander Men’s Spring and Resort 2018: Lucie and Luke Meier debuted at Jil Sander with a women’s and a men’s collections, which offered a fresh, new take on the signature rigorous elegance 

of the brand. 

Fausto Puglisi Men’s Spring 2018: Urban, baggy silhouettes met references to the Ancient Greek and Roman cultures in this capsule collection.

By  on June 22, 2017

Boris Bidjan Saberi delivered a strong collection full of massive chunky knits, familiar layering techniques and colors spanning an array of earth tones that brought to mind explorers in an urban jungle.

The German designer first mined his archive of military garments. “I had the idea to create a look that is basically a camouflage,” explained Bidjan Saberi. “Like one garment of this, the other garment here and these nonmatching greens together. It would look like a camouflage on one person — without being a [true] camouflage.”

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