In his debut official showing to the press, Los Angeles-based streetwear designer Guillermo Andrade wanted to talk about more than just fashion. Referencing what he described as a decaying interpretation of Americana, Andrade sought to question the American Dream in the context of current events — as a Guatemalan immigrant to the U.S., he has firsthand experience of situations similar to those that have hit the headlines in recent weeks — and the prevailing preppy vision of American ideals.

One hoodie featured a blurred print of an abandoned Detroit school with the Stars and Stripes turned upside down in the foreground. Another theme showed haunting pictures of a decaying theater in a dusty color palette inspired by Detroit.

The basics — printed T-shirts, simple yet well executed hoodies, denim items — were stonewashed or given a hand-painted feel that transmitted the same message in a more subtle fashion.

Elsewhere, Andrade brought in new shapes and techniques for spring that have been enabled by producing certain pieces — a black leather shirt, another in black silk, pinstripe drawstring pants and matching worker’s shirt that are as close as he would like to get to suiting, or quirkier 3-D-printed silk chiffon check pants — in Italy for the first time as he expands his reach and register.

By  on June 21, 2018

In his debut official showing to the press, Los Angeles-based streetwear designer Guillermo Andrade wanted to talk about more than just fashion. Referencing what he described as a decaying interpretation of Americana, Andrade sought to question the American Dream in the context of current events — as a Guatemalan immigrant to the U.S., he has firsthand experience of situations similar to those that have hit the headlines in recent weeks — and the prevailing preppy vision of American ideals.

One hoodie featured a blurred print of an abandoned Detroit school with the Stars and Stripes turned upside down in the foreground. Another theme showed haunting pictures of a decaying theater in a dusty color palette inspired by Detroit.

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