Ex Infinitas designer Lukas Vincent worked a bright color palette for spring, including vivid blues and greens, tan and pink. Shiny neon-yellow boots with a pointy cowboy toe and black soles brought a harder, sexy edge to the lineup — the tall version stretched nearly to the knees, splayed out at the top, with the words “no wave” printed in black. The Australian has been spending a lot of time in Paris and in Italy to streamline production at his upscale streetwear brand, leaving the surfer literally without waves. The message was also printed, with no space between the words, on pink towels — which doubled as skirts — and yellow sweaters.

Trousers were well cut, showing off those boots, just wide enough, and perfectly flat fronted, vibrantly colored. To present the collection, Vincent crafted a grotty surfboard workshop setting that was painstakingly realistic. As labels explore ways to impose themselves on the cluttered minds of consumers, he opted for a forceful route — visitors were greeted by a model hunched over in a gollum pose, staggering around a dystopian setting of motorcycle parts. Was he going to lunge forward in attack mode or did he just want to guard his partially built treasure?

By  on June 25, 2018

Ex Infinitas designer Lukas Vincent worked a bright color palette for spring, including vivid blues and greens, tan and pink. Shiny neon-yellow boots with a pointy cowboy toe and black soles brought a harder, sexy edge to the lineup — the tall version stretched nearly to the knees, splayed out at the top, with the words “no wave” printed in black. The Australian has been spending a lot of time in Paris and in Italy to streamline production at his upscale streetwear brand, leaving the surfer literally without waves. The message was also printed, with no space between the words, on pink towels — which doubled as skirts — and yellow sweaters.

Trousers were well cut, showing off those boots, just wide enough, and perfectly flat fronted, vibrantly colored. To present the collection, Vincent crafted a grotty surfboard workshop setting that was painstakingly realistic. As labels explore ways to impose themselves on the cluttered minds of consumers, he opted for a forceful route — visitors were greeted by a model hunched over in a gollum pose, staggering around a dystopian setting of motorcycle parts. Was he going to lunge forward in attack mode or did he just want to guard his partially built treasure?

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