Misbhv merged Polish jazz music, poster art and utilitarianism for spring, moving away slightly from the underground club culture that has characterized the young label’s ethos until now and giving it a more clearly stated “post-Soviet” aesthetic in a wacky yet fun collection.

Earlier this month, the label founded by Natalia Maczek staged its first runway show in Warsaw, a coed affair that took place in the iconic-yet-controversial Palace of Culture and Science building, which also appeared on the front cover of Vogue Poland’s first issue earlier in the year.

Prints by Roslaw Szaybo played a key role in the collection, with a razor-blade motif featuring the brand’s logo among the most striking, seen for example on a nylon performance fabric cape for the 21st-century Dracula. Elsewhere, the 19th-century painting “Frenzy of Exultations” by Polish artist Władysław Podkowiński featured on a mesh turtleneck that put an artistic spin on clubwear.

Elsewhere, outsized silk shirts were printed with the text “Polish Jazz,” and T-shirts and hoodies were printed with poster art from Eighties raves.

These were contrasted with tailoring and workwear with a more military spin — cue crinkled nylon overalls, looks inspired by Communist uniforms and leather jackets and shirts interpreted in colorful turquoise and lime green.

By  on June 22, 2018

Misbhv merged Polish jazz music, poster art and utilitarianism for spring, moving away slightly from the underground club culture that has characterized the young label’s ethos until now and giving it a more clearly stated “post-Soviet” aesthetic in a wacky yet fun collection.

Earlier this month, the label founded by Natalia Maczek staged its first runway show in Warsaw, a coed affair that took place in the iconic-yet-controversial Palace of Culture and Science building, which also appeared on the front cover of Vogue Poland’s first issue earlier in the year.

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