Emerging in packs, the members of eight gangs — “the new warriors” — took turns prowling the floor, like a teenage horror film.

Each had its own look, banner and soundtrack, with a costume-y, cartoonish manga-meets-“A Clockwork Orange” vibe binding the collection.

Jun Takahashi for his tribes worked a collage of streetwear and ethnic codes, like for the get-up of the Bootleg Truths, a mash-up of references including revisited tartan kilts.

The opening rasta-rockers, The New Warriors, had customized their skinny camel and beige embroidered bikers, bombers and elongated hoodies with chains and pins, their wrists loaded with gold bangles. Posters of fictitious bands, including The Dead Hermits, featured on the backs of the clothes.

Goth gang the Vlads sported total-look New Wave-influenced black tailoring, coats and gloves marked with distorted white photographic prints. The Zenmondooos, meanwhile, with their Hannibal Lecter-esque masks and red swooshes across the eyes, were more into motorcross garb like graphic sweatshirts and synthetic track pants with elbow and knee-pads.

Most fun were the dead-eyed, bespectacled Bloody Geekers in their crisply creased pants, tartan shirts and printed sweatshirts, wielding Day-gGlo hammers. The wardrobe of The Larms, lovers of all things bright and chemical, including high-shine plastic purple anoraks, was also supercool.

Takahashi, in his ongoing ode to youth, this time stuck closer to home, capturing in a fun show the way that Japanese youth, when they take a theme, will push it to the max.

By  on June 21, 2018

Emerging in packs, the members of eight gangs — “the new warriors” — took turns prowling the floor, like a teenage horror film.

Each had its own look, banner and soundtrack, with a costume-y, cartoonish manga-meets-“A Clockwork Orange” vibe binding the collection.

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