A dedicated modernist, Francisco Costa seeks to push the deeply entrenched, unfettered ethos of Calvin Klein Collection in ways that excite without sacrificing sophisticated ease. Often, he draws from artistic inspirations. For pre-fall, the starting point came from 20th century British sculptor Barbara Hepworth, who favored serene, neutral colors for her bold, curvaceous work. While Costa drew mostly from Hepworth’s palette, his skin-baring silhouettes reflected the fluid sensuality of her ample abstract shapes.

 

Working in camel, gray and black, Costa struck a fine balance between tailoring and movement, and between the two sides of city dressing — urbane polish and street edge. He cut jackets two ways, bodycon or on the loose, both over the flat-front, full pants he introduced for spring. Details came sparingly for maximum impact: a thin row of contrast stitching down the back of a jacket; half-dollar sized artisanal snap closures; deep, detachable fake fur cuffs on a caramel coat.

 

For girls who prefer to work the languid side of cool, Costa paired long sweaters to longer skirts, and continued with spring’s mesmerizing prints, here replacing last season’s soft-focus florals with abstracted animal spots, which he used for a long coat-and-dress duo, boudoir-like in movement if not in cut.

 

About the lineup’s sly sex appeal, Costa is feeling for a return to pumps, though he’s not militant about it, retaining comfort-shoe options as well. As for the clothes, he cut into what could be considered a subtle monastic vibe literally, with deep Vs at the neck of dresses and thigh-high skirt slits. He often showed midriff-baring bandeau tops under jackets. They looked great while playing to essential versatility of pre-fall — not all tailoring is office-bound.

By  on December 7, 2015

A dedicated modernist, Francisco Costa seeks to push the deeply entrenched, unfettered ethos of Calvin Klein Collection in ways that excite without sacrificing sophisticated ease. Often, he draws from artistic inspirations. For pre-fall, the starting point came from 20th century British sculptor Barbara Hepworth, who favored serene, neutral colors for her bold, curvaceous work. While Costa drew mostly from Hepworth’s palette, his skin-baring silhouettes reflected the fluid sensuality of her ample abstract shapes.

 

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