Michael Kors hated geometry in high school. For resort he revisited the subject, finding a new affinity and far better results than his sophomore-year 68 average. Intentionally or otherwise, there was a bit of the math geek to his blazers — he’s bringing them back, baby — knife-pleated skirts and cropped pants. And when’s the last time you heard of a dickey (of the collar-only variety)? Throughout, he played black, white and camel off of “happy colors — acid green, aqua, geranium.”

 

Yet for all its girlish charm, this collection lost none of the typical Kors-ean chic, nor its luxury. His customer is a math geek who discovered some obscure algorithm that she developed into an Internet start-up that made her rich enough to commission Harry Potter-striped mufflers and hexagon intarsia coats in wildly indulgent mink. And Kors countered the structure of shantung and sturdy crepe with a lovely scarf-dressing story, including hexagon-print shirt looks with French cuffs left deliberately undone.

 

Accessories also got with the geometric program. Clutches, shoulder bags and chunky platforms were color-blocked with bravado. But ever the pragmatist, Kors knows that sometimes a mile-high shoe just won’t do. Thus, his flat, mannish slide. “I always love a shoe,” he said, “that feels like you’re running out of the house to get milk.”

By  on June 2, 2015

Michael Kors hated geometry in high school. For resort he revisited the subject, finding a new affinity and far better results than his sophomore-year 68 average. Intentionally or otherwise, there was a bit of the math geek to his blazers — he’s bringing them back, baby — knife-pleated skirts and cropped pants. And when’s the last time you heard of a dickey (of the collar-only variety)? Throughout, he played black, white and camel off of “happy colors — acid green, aqua, geranium.”

 

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