For resort, Joseph’s creative director Louise Trotter looked at uniforms — literally. Inspired by industrial, military and even prison garb, she reworked the utilitarian aesthetic, creating easy, luxe looks in a palette that encompassed marine, indigo, white and beige, with pops of marigold yellow and cardinal red, working details such as top-stitching into the collection.

 

Silhouettes included a long, belted oversize whipcord coat paired with high-waisted, roomy factory-floor pants in cotton and silk, with button-up flies and oversized pockets. Reversible sheepskin – typically used as a liner in military wear — was employed for a waistcoat and a jacket. Top-stitching ran throughout the collection, as did apronlike, wrappable features on shirts and skirts. And there were stripes in abundance: Bold, prisoner stripes woven into jacquards for dresses, tops and trousers. Pinstripes featured on Bermuda-style shorts. Cotton-hopsack workwear stripes on linen trousers.

 

“A uniform has a reason for being,” said Trotter. “It’s how you translate those details and purposeful garments, ultimately — because fashion is quite whimsical.”

By  on June 8, 2016

For resort, Joseph’s creative director Louise Trotter looked at uniforms — literally. Inspired by industrial, military and even prison garb, she reworked the utilitarian aesthetic, creating easy, luxe looks in a palette that encompassed marine, indigo, white and beige, with pops of marigold yellow and cardinal red, working details such as top-stitching into the collection.

 

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