Camilla Freeman-Topper of Camilla and Marc said their resort collection reflected the sense of freedom, positivity and optimism their Paris and New York friends have. Consequentially, they worked an angel motif into some of the pieces figuratively as well as more literally: for example, as a print on blousy delicate tops while more figuratively as an almost calligraphic depiction on a lilac crinkled georgette dress.

“The color base was drawn from American abstract expressionist artist Helen Frankenthaler’s body of work. We used many of the colors combinations she uses — pops of rasberry with ink, white with rose water, peach with grass-green, violet with lavender,” she explained.

Elsewhere, the collection features sturdy jeans, white cotton crisp shirts and a great flirty gathered dress number, ruched short dresses in crepe and a beautiful jacquard midlength frilly number.

See More From the 2018 Resort Collections:
Sandy Liang Resort 2018: The overall tone was noticeably quieter, more relaxed, but retained that playful dose of subversion to keep things modern.
Brock Collection Resort 2018: Laura Vassar and Kristopher Brock brought fairytale romance into modern reality.
Pamella Roland Resort 2018: Pamella Roland’s starting point for her newest collection took place in her own backyard.
Redemption Resort 2018: The inspiration for the collection is “aristocratic grunge.”
Rodebjer Resort 2018: The designer offered up a lot of layers to transition from party to street, strict to mildly wild.
Sonia Rykiel Resort 2018: The Sonia Rykiel girl took a trip to California and returned to Paris refreshed.
By  on June 13, 2017

Camilla Freeman-Topper of Camilla and Marc said their resort collection reflected the sense of freedom, positivity and optimism their Paris and New York friends have. Consequentially, they worked an angel motif into some of the pieces figuratively as well as more literally: for example, as a print on blousy delicate tops while more figuratively as an almost calligraphic depiction on a lilac crinkled georgette dress.

“The color base was drawn from American abstract expressionist artist Helen Frankenthaler’s body of work. We used many of the colors combinations she uses — pops of rasberry with ink, white with rose water, peach with grass-green, violet with lavender,” she explained.

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