Stuart Vevers is well aware that ready-to-wear is a relatively new proposition from Coach. The customer is still getting used to it. Vevers has carefully constructed the brand’s identity clothes-wise, establishing a strong baseline through statement outerwear with a hardy Americana attitude — shearlings, varsity jackets — and saw resort as an opportunity to gently expand on that.

“This arrives in stores in November,” Vevers said. “I was thinking about the Coach girl dressing up because it felt really right this season.” That would be holiday party season, which requires festive attire. There were more dresses: Prairie styles came with star prints and riveted Western embroidery. A black slip had femininity and edge with lace and leather detailing, and a dress with a short, tiered tulle skirt had star burst embroideries. A cheeky print, featuring a penguin drinking Champagne, martinis and a glass of wine, was ready for a good time.

Vevers gave the look stylish grit and weight by layering the dresses under the signature outerwear, including satin varsities with scenic souvenir embroidery, a burnished leather jacket, a new double-faced wool and chicly wild Chewbacca-inspired shearlings. “There’s a thread of sci-fi — specifically ‘Star Wars,’” Vevers said. Playfulness and personalization was key to the look: jackets had Tyrannosaurus rex charms, there was specialty patchwork denim and a new “Mascots” collection of sweaters, T-shirts and canvas totes emblazoned with Rexy, Sharky and Uni, the dinosaur, shark and unicorn that are becoming house characters. Quality and execution kept things fun but not silly.

And lest anyone forget, Coach is still mainly an accessories house. Two of the standouts in that realm were a pair of sequin cowboy booties and the new Double Swagger bag, a souped up version of the original Swagger.

By  on June 1, 2017

Stuart Vevers is well aware that ready-to-wear is a relatively new proposition from Coach. The customer is still getting used to it. Vevers has carefully constructed the brand’s identity clothes-wise, establishing a strong baseline through statement outerwear with a hardy Americana attitude — shearlings, varsity jackets — and saw resort as an opportunity to gently expand on that.

“This arrives in stores in November,” Vevers said. “I was thinking about the Coach girl dressing up because it felt really right this season.” That would be holiday party season, which requires festive attire. There were more dresses: Prairie styles came with star prints and riveted Western embroidery. A black slip had femininity and edge with lace and leather detailing, and a dress with a short, tiered tulle skirt had star burst embroideries. A cheeky print, featuring a penguin drinking Champagne, martinis and a glass of wine, was ready for a good time.

To continue reading this article...

load comments