Sander Lak’s spring collection was a departure from what he’s been doing at Sies Marjan in the last few very strong seasons. Interestingly, he said spring was about finally feeling at home. “I’ve lived in 20 countries and this is the first time I feel at home,” Lak said after the show. “It’s very new to me. It’s like a first love.” How exactly that translated into the clothes he didn’t quite articulate, but in general the collection was more based in reality than his previous wildly colorful, fantasy-driven lineups.

Lak didn’t drain the color out of everything, but he did paint outside his proverbial lines to embrace white, the rare color on the spectrum he hasn’t used much. He infused white looks with an optic starkness and textural treatments, crinkling a spare, long shirtdress, and cutting a coat and cargo pants from paper-coated fabric that had a cool chalky texture. They were some of the most interesting pieces in the lineup, though some of the other neutrals Lak proposed, including drab green workwear and twists on classic Breton stripes — usually a crowd-pleaser — felt flat.

The palette of unusual, intriguing tones for which Lak is known picked up as the show went on, on an electric blue crop top worn over a matching skirt with a plastic snake-embossed top layer; a lemon dress done in tiers of undulating pleats; and an orange dress that was draped, twisted and trimmed in gently scalloped ruffles. The casting of models young and not so young, as well as friend and family, including Lak’s mom, underscored the fact that it was a collection full of individual looks and pieces.

By  on September 9, 2018

Sander Lak’s spring collection was a departure from what he’s been doing at Sies Marjan in the last few very strong seasons. Interestingly, he said spring was about finally feeling at home. “I’ve lived in 20 countries and this is the first time I feel at home,” Lak said after the show. “It’s very new to me. It’s like a first love.” How exactly that translated into the clothes he didn’t quite articulate, but in general the collection was more based in reality than his previous wildly colorful, fantasy-driven lineups.

Lak didn’t drain the color out of everything, but he did paint outside his proverbial lines to embrace white, the rare color on the spectrum he hasn’t used much. He infused white looks with an optic starkness and textural treatments, crinkling a spare, long shirtdress, and cutting a coat and cargo pants from paper-coated fabric that had a cool chalky texture. They were some of the most interesting pieces in the lineup, though some of the other neutrals Lak proposed, including drab green workwear and twists on classic Breton stripes — usually a crowd-pleaser — felt flat.

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