Rad Hourani is among those indie designers who have bid adieu to the fashion week format, rejecting its constraints and deeming it untimely in the age of live-streams and social media. To present his trans-seasonal couture lineup, the designer opted for an exhibition instead.

“It’s not logical for me to work on a collection for six months and show it in six minutes, with everybody rushing backstage, and not really taking the time to look at what it is,” he explained, likening couture to sculpture.

The new format must have uplifted Hourani, who brought unexpected color variations (lilac, turquoise, blue and red) into his habitual black and white. He worked ultrasoft plastic, which mimicked the texture of leather, and used nylon to adorn some artfully tailored numbers: pleated and re-pleated blazers with large lapels, and collarless tops and vests that Hourani treated like origami. Depending on the styling, one look could suit a man or a woman.

The exhibition, which will run through Jan. 30 at the Canadian Cultural Center, also showcases photographs and a video showing the couture looks in motion.

By  on January 26, 2015

Rad Hourani is among those indie designers who have bid adieu to the fashion week format, rejecting its constraints and deeming it untimely in the age of live-streams and social media. To present his trans-seasonal couture lineup, the designer opted for an exhibition instead.

“It’s not logical for me to work on a collection for six months and show it in six minutes, with everybody rushing backstage, and not really taking the time to look at what it is,” he explained, likening couture to sculpture.

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