Even in a crowded elevator, a model off Christopher Kane’s runway catches your attention, especially since one of the linchpin details of his spring collection — plastic cable ties — was jutting out of her ponytail, threatening to poke the eyes of any number of occupants.

 

Kane still carries the torch for daring, industrial-strength fashion rooted in the now of tangled traffic, blaring screens, rampant technology and graffiti. He’s done flowers — spelled it out across a sweatshirt a few seasons back — and moved on to spray-paint that splatters, clots and drips off jersey dresses and black office suiting.

 

There was nothing folkloric about the long silk fringe that coiled around trousers or wound like a sash around a little black dress. It had the same graphic impact as the graffiti — a rebellious gesture via color — just like those cable ties, also threaded through grommets to cinch the waist of liquid jersey dresses.

 

Plastic must not be comfortable to wear — and frankly looks cheap — but Kane dares to keep using it, splicing it into geometric shapes and inserting them into asymmetrical dresses. Even lace, the softest thing in the show, came in searing, Stabilo colors.

 

You might brand Kane out of step in a season of genteel garden-party dresses. But more than likely, he’s a few steps ahead.

By  on September 21, 2015

Even in a crowded elevator, a model off Christopher Kane’s runway catches your attention, especially since one of the linchpin details of his spring collection — plastic cable ties — was jutting out of her ponytail, threatening to poke the eyes of any number of occupants.

 

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