London-based designer Nick Wakeman, known for the clean, minimal pieces she creates for her Studio Nicholson line, said she had wanted to “bring shape back to the feminine form,” with her spring collection. Wakeman also took her cues from Deborah Turbeville’s shadowy images of groups of models, which the late photographer shot for Vogue in the Seventies.

The result was a lineup of simple, unfussy looks with an arty edge, such as a belted calf-length dress in a black-and-white cotton dobby fabric, or wide-leg culottes in a black-and-white gingham plissé fabric, worn with a white cotton tunic, also belted at the waist. The looks stayed true to Wakeman’s low-key aesthetic, but subtly took it in a lighter, breezier direction.

By  on September 25, 2015

London-based designer Nick Wakeman, known for the clean, minimal pieces she creates for her Studio Nicholson line, said she had wanted to “bring shape back to the feminine form,” with her spring collection. Wakeman also took her cues from Deborah Turbeville’s shadowy images of groups of models, which the late photographer shot for Vogue in the Seventies.

The result was a lineup of simple, unfussy looks with an arty edge, such as a belted calf-length dress in a black-and-white cotton dobby fabric, or wide-leg culottes in a black-and-white gingham plissé fabric, worn with a white cotton tunic, also belted at the waist. The looks stayed true to Wakeman’s low-key aesthetic, but subtly took it in a lighter, breezier direction.

To continue reading this article...

load comments