The Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with precious metals known as kintsugi gave Jonathan Cohen his starting point for spring. He approached the idea both figuratively and literally — the former by using a photo-realistic print of crushed porcelain and crystal that was segmented into the fabric, and the latter via a long tank that pieced together panels of petal embroidery and netting. Elsewhere, black cocktail dresses featured gold threading details on fragmented hems and pants had raw edges.

 

Overall, this was a well-thought-out lineup for Cohen, who has been in business since 2011, albeit a bit under the radar. Perhaps slow and steady will win the race.

By  on September 12, 2015

The Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with precious metals known as kintsugi gave Jonathan Cohen his starting point for spring. He approached the idea both figuratively and literally — the former by using a photo-realistic print of crushed porcelain and crystal that was segmented into the fabric, and the latter via a long tank that pieced together panels of petal embroidery and netting. Elsewhere, black cocktail dresses featured gold threading details on fragmented hems and pants had raw edges.

 

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