Fashion can be political, or at least attempt to be, as Kerby Jean-Raymond demonstrated on his spring 2016 runway. The show started with a film recounting recent high-profile cases of police brutality against African-Americans and voicing the opinions of several personalities (Marc Ecko, Robin Givhan, Usher Raymond) on systematic racism. It was very impactful — perhaps setting expectations for the clothes way too high.

Both the men’s and women’s looks centered on hard-edged streetwear with futuristic undertones: utility dress shirts, asymmetrical overalls, kimono-style jackets, strapped biker jackets, netted leather trousers and track suits — none of which screamed revolutionary or groundbreaking. Nonetheless, perhaps Kerby-Raymond intended for this to be more about something bigger than fashion and materialistic distractions. It sure made the audience think.

By  on September 11, 2015

Fashion can be political, or at least attempt to be, as Kerby Jean-Raymond demonstrated on his spring 2016 runway. The show started with a film recounting recent high-profile cases of police brutality against African-Americans and voicing the opinions of several personalities (Marc Ecko, Robin Givhan, Usher Raymond) on systematic racism. It was very impactful — perhaps setting expectations for the clothes way too high.

Both the men’s and women’s looks centered on hard-edged streetwear with futuristic undertones: utility dress shirts, asymmetrical overalls, kimono-style jackets, strapped biker jackets, netted leather trousers and track suits — none of which screamed revolutionary or groundbreaking. Nonetheless, perhaps Kerby-Raymond intended for this to be more about something bigger than fashion and materialistic distractions. It sure made the audience think.

To continue reading this article...

load comments