For spring, Rachel Comey focused on materials; more specifically, she explored the degradation of fabrics in some way, whether by washing, stoning, bleaching, fraying or even just letting pieces fall and hang loose. “In the spring and summer, it feels nice to be a little undone,” she said. “And then it was about the reconstruction of those pieces; trying to make it all feel at ease — and chic.”

 

Comey fashioned stonewashed silk velvet into long and languid silhouettes; a silvery blue trenchcoat had just the right amount of funk. Elsewhere, a sheer, short-sleeved jacket in embossed polyurethane offered another offbeat take on outerwear. Relaxed suiting came in Army green and pale orange washed linen, and a dress featuring circular patchwork was a nod to another of the collection’s themes: a Judith Plant essay titled “The Circle is Gathering.”

 

Her runway models — a diverse cast of dancers from the Robbinschilds choreography group — made a moving statement about individuality as they waltzed slowly across the room, many maintaining fierce eye contact with guests. “They’re just so interesting and so realized as performers and women,” Comey said. “Ever since I opened my store over a year ago, I’ve gotten so into particular women — where they’re going and what they need and what their bodies are.”

 

Those who made the trek to Red Hook, Brooklyn, including a celebrity contingent, were treated to a three-course dinner presented by Bon Appétit Feast or Fashion — a Comey tradition — this season accompanied by a performance from singer-songwriter Justin Vivian Bond inside the behemoth Pioneer Works Center for Arts and Innovation (which had a “real-feel” temperature of about 110 degrees; several guests turned their menus into paper fans.) As the show got underway, models swayed in unison to Bond’s heartbreaking rendition of the Tim Buckley song “Driftin'” before weaving through the dinner tables one by one or in pairs.

By  on September 10, 2015

For spring, Rachel Comey focused on materials; more specifically, she explored the degradation of fabrics in some way, whether by washing, stoning, bleaching, fraying or even just letting pieces fall and hang loose. “In the spring and summer, it feels nice to be a little undone,” she said. “And then it was about the reconstruction of those pieces; trying to make it all feel at ease — and chic.”

 

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