Newly inducted CFDA member and Los Angeles-based designer Ted Kim called his spring collection — also his debut at New York Fashion Week — an “urban jungle” as an homage to New York, where he got his start designing for Donna Karan, Michael Kors and Anne Klein before starting his own label in 2011.

Composed solely of graphic jacquard knitwear with a few suede and leather pieces mixed in, Kim’s collection drew from the city’s architecture in the textures and prints of his bodycon dresses and tops; one look was derived from the Art Deco style of the Chrysler Building. He also reinterpreted the works of two artists he discovered on a recent trip to Colombia: Fanny Sanín and Alejandro Otero, both of whom were devotees of geometric abstraction.

The colorful lineup fused tribal and industrial references in a feminine way, with some looks featuring fringe and mesh detailing. Most of the styles, like the ones worn by Katy Perry, Sofía Vergara and Beyoncé, were meant to hug the body, but Kim also offered some chic options that didn’t. These included a studded black-leather culotte jumpsuit and a long, voluminous striped jacquard dress with mesh panels. But it should be noted that as a whole, the collection did feel a bit derivative of other labels known for textured, bodycon knits, such as Jonathan Simkhai, Ohne Titel and Azzedine Alaïa.

By  on September 18, 2015

Newly inducted CFDA member and Los Angeles-based designer Ted Kim called his spring collection — also his debut at New York Fashion Week — an “urban jungle” as an homage to New York, where he got his start designing for Donna Karan, Michael Kors and Anne Klein before starting his own label in 2011.

Composed solely of graphic jacquard knitwear with a few suede and leather pieces mixed in, Kim’s collection drew from the city’s architecture in the textures and prints of his bodycon dresses and tops; one look was derived from the Art Deco style of the Chrysler Building. He also reinterpreted the works of two artists he discovered on a recent trip to Colombia: Fanny Sanín and Alejandro Otero, both of whom were devotees of geometric abstraction.

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