There’s always a risk when fashion designers take inspiration from architecture, particularly of stiffness or awkward volumes.

 

This season, Akris designer Albert Kriemler went gaga for acclaimed Japanese practitioner Sou Fujimoto, perhaps best known by the fashion crowd for designing the cloudlike Serpentine Gallery pavilion in London in 2013, and a shopping center in the Miami Design District, all vivid blue glass.

 

The pleasant surprise was that this was one of Kriemler’s breeziest collections in years, as he transposed Fujimoto’s grid patterns and transparency onto sleek fit-and-flare dresses, snazzy shirt-and-shorts combos and spare tailoring.

 

The show opened with the perforated roof of the future House of Hungarian Music in Budapest echoed on white cotton shirts and Bermuda shorts, with some in the audience murmuring about a resemblance, given the brand’s roots in St. Gallen, Switzerland, to Swiss cheese. In fact, the cutouts looked equally scrumptious on sleek jersey dresses and A-line mesh skirts — longer hemlines gaining importance this European season.

 

The show progressed in segments, drawing on details from specific Fujimoto projects. A sheath dress and coat in rows of cork with a few squares of transparency too closely resembled a wooden house in the forest. But between the languid silk crepe pantsuits, elongated biker vests and mesh tops and skirts, there was plenty for women to live in.

By  on October 4, 2015

There’s always a risk when fashion designers take inspiration from architecture, particularly of stiffness or awkward volumes.

 

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