Blasts of disco smoke and churning techno announced a new, more tough-minded direction for Haider Ackermann. His fast-paced show packed a punch with its acid colors and punk splashes of white paint — a reprieve from the glacial, contemplative parades of yore.

 

“A gang of girls, but each one an individual,” the designer said backstage, describing a wish to convey a “strong” look for a “strange” world. His gang members strode out mostly in cool, low-slung pants similar to the ones in his terrific spring men’s collection. Her boyish trousers came in glossy satins, colorful shantung, rugged leather, shredded patchworks or black wool with grosgrain waistbands.

 

Pointy boots accentuated the rock ‘n’ roll mood, as did cropped leather biker jackets and vests, while tender touches included chiffon blouses with tight rows of frothy ruffles ringing the arms or the neck, or lined up on jabots. He poured his most girlish gang members into sinuous fishtail tank dresses in lustrous silks and pane velvets.

 

While Ackerman’s buddy Tilda Swinton was not in attendance, her turn in “Only Lovers Left Alive,” the 2013 Jim Jarmusch vampire film, echoed the mood of the show. His pale models, some veiled and with bits of troll doll hair jutting from their heads, resembled types that only rouse after sundown and live in loungewear.

 

Cue an array of duster coats — either tuxedo style or in boudoir velvets — and his fetish fringed scarves seductively swooping over and under mannish jackets and vests. Bring on the night.

By  on October 3, 2015

Blasts of disco smoke and churning techno announced a new, more tough-minded direction for Haider Ackermann. His fast-paced show packed a punch with its acid colors and punk splashes of white paint — a reprieve from the glacial, contemplative parades of yore.

 

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