Some ideas are better in theory than execution, and that was the case for Cynthia Rowley’s spring presentation, held in her supercool three-story townhouse and office headquarters on Morton Street in the West Village. The collection — which riffed on boudoir themes — was shown on an elevated platform in the back of the lofty garage, where models frolicked as white feathers swirled in the air, reenacting what appeared to be the aftermath of a playful pillow fight, though Rowley said she was aiming for a “feathered snow globe.” Separating the models and guests was a floor-to-ceiling screen mounted as a courtesy — without it, guests would’ve been covered in feathers, too. But the screen wasn’t fully transparent, making it difficult, nay impossible, to get a clear glimpse of the clothing. It also wasn’t fully closed, and several guests near the front were, in fact, covered in feathers.

Alas.

Rowley said her latest lineup was about re-imagining clothes in new contexts. “The way you wear swimwear, pajamas, kimonos, slips, nighties…and wearing those things every day,” she said. “And [rendering] luxury fabrics in really relaxed shapes and silhouettes.”

It was an ultragirly affair, showcasing colorful silk and sheer chiffon high-neck mini and maxidresses with flared hems, bell sleeves, tiered ruffles and floral prints and embroideries. A metallic bathing suit worn under a white silk robe — with sunglasses and piled-on jewelry — would have looked right at home poolside at the Beverly Hills Hotel. The best maximalist look in the collection was a coat vest with fuchsia piping, belted at the waist in a rich ombré floral brocade and worn over a long-sleeve micro floral-printed dress.

By  on September 9, 2016

Some ideas are better in theory than execution, and that was the case for Cynthia Rowley’s spring presentation, held in her supercool three-story townhouse and office headquarters on Morton Street in the West Village. The collection — which riffed on boudoir themes — was shown on an elevated platform in the back of the lofty garage, where models frolicked as white feathers swirled in the air, reenacting what appeared to be the aftermath of a playful pillow fight, though Rowley said she was aiming for a “feathered snow globe.” Separating the models and guests was a floor-to-ceiling screen mounted as a courtesy — without it, guests would’ve been covered in feathers, too. But the screen wasn’t fully transparent, making it difficult, nay impossible, to get a clear glimpse of the clothing. It also wasn’t fully closed, and several guests near the front were, in fact, covered in feathers.

Alas.

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