Harlem in the Seventies — as captured in a series of street style photographs by the late Jack Garofalo — served as the starting point for Edun’s groovy spring collection. Exploring the intersection of African graphics and textiles in a youthful, energetic urban environment, the design team channeled a cool, retro vibe in their latest lineup, which showcased a range of textures that included more fabrics developed in Africa than ever before. There were handwoven cotton canvas, striped Lurex jacquard knits and shweshwe, a cotton fabric sourced from one of South Africa’s oldest textile mills, Da Gama Textiles. A series of looks in cotton jersey also featured embroidery in partnership with the Rwandan women’s workshop Ibaba.

The nods to Harlem resulted in an eclectic lineup with a relaxed attitude. Pattern-mixing and unexpected layering was key, as seen in the collection’s printed linen zip-up skirts worn over matching trousers. A circular graphic print energized a zip-up dress worn over cropped, fringed pants. Elsewhere, sleeveless wide-leg jumpsuits and flared trousers with exaggerated slits riffed on classic Seventies silhouettes. Most impressive was a printed and embossed leather dress inspired by mosaic flooring seen in one of Garofalo’s photos of a Harlem café.

For spring, the brand unveiled a new line of recycled aluminum, brass and wood jewelry in collaboration with Soko, a Kenyan-based company that supports local artisans, as well as handbags in suede and leather with contrast whip-stitching details and recycled metal handles.

By  on September 23, 2016

Harlem in the Seventies — as captured in a series of street style photographs by the late Jack Garofalo — served as the starting point for Edun’s groovy spring collection. Exploring the intersection of African graphics and textiles in a youthful, energetic urban environment, the design team channeled a cool, retro vibe in their latest lineup, which showcased a range of textures that included more fabrics developed in Africa than ever before. There were handwoven cotton canvas, striped Lurex jacquard knits and shweshwe, a cotton fabric sourced from one of South Africa’s oldest textile mills, Da Gama Textiles. A series of looks in cotton jersey also featured embroidery in partnership with the Rwandan women’s workshop Ibaba.

The nods to Harlem resulted in an eclectic lineup with a relaxed attitude. Pattern-mixing and unexpected layering was key, as seen in the collection’s printed linen zip-up skirts worn over matching trousers. A circular graphic print energized a zip-up dress worn over cropped, fringed pants. Elsewhere, sleeveless wide-leg jumpsuits and flared trousers with exaggerated slits riffed on classic Seventies silhouettes. Most impressive was a printed and embossed leather dress inspired by mosaic flooring seen in one of Garofalo’s photos of a Harlem café.

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