Veronica Swanson Beard and Veronica Miele Beard had a wildly entertaining spring presentation celebrating all things Americana. They enlisted interior designer Ken Fulk to set up the basement of their new Madison Avenue boutique as a lavish apartment featuring leopard-print walls and festooned with stars and stripes (there were flags everywhere) and images indicative of the late Seventies and early Eighties. There were even two rollerskating girls in red leotards in front of the store.

It may have been good kitschy fun — and the experience was a blast — but the sisters-in-law were all business when it came to the clothes. Miele Beard noted that the reason they opted to present here was to “show [people] that retail is not dead — stores need to live.”

On offer were the label’s signature dickey jackets, but also some new shapes, such as a double-breasted cutaway look. Great daytime pieces abounded, from chic pantsuits to military jackets with lace appliqués, as well as pretty floral dresses with ruffles, a striped strapless jumpsuit, distressed sweaters and a little gingham skirt — each chic and effortless and designed to take a woman comfortably through the day.

By  on September 11, 2016

Veronica Swanson Beard and Veronica Miele Beard had a wildly entertaining spring presentation celebrating all things Americana. They enlisted interior designer Ken Fulk to set up the basement of their new Madison Avenue boutique as a lavish apartment featuring leopard-print walls and festooned with stars and stripes (there were flags everywhere) and images indicative of the late Seventies and early Eighties. There were even two rollerskating girls in red leotards in front of the store.

It may have been good kitschy fun — and the experience was a blast — but the sisters-in-law were all business when it came to the clothes. Miele Beard noted that the reason they opted to present here was to “show [people] that retail is not dead — stores need to live.”

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