Sometimes it’s just a matter of time. “I’m finally out of the mourning period,” said Alessandro Dell’Acqua referring to the loss of his namesake brand in 2009. With this beautiful spring collection, Dell’Acqua celebrated the signature codes of his style, which for a few seasons since the launch of No. 21 in 2010, he preferred to keep locked in a drawer rather than infusing in his new upper contemporary line.

“I cited myself,” he said, pointing at the picture of a 1996’s runway look — a see-through striped slipdress, which he actually reproduced for this collection.

But the designer did more than reedit old clothes. He injected new, fresh energy in his signature sensual, feminine look, focused on lingerie-inspired silhouettes, delicate colors and a touch of sparkling glamour. The show opened with a group of 21 outfits, worked in different shades of nude and pink. They included slipdresses, draped frocks and straight skirts all crafted from ethereal fabrics, including organza, tulle and lace, which were embellished with tonal shiny sequins and feather accents.

Focusing on transparencies, Dell’Acqua showed a soft hand when played with layering, making everything look chic and elegant. The overall apparent fragility was balanced by the introduction of soft knitted cardigans and sweaters with a cozy feel, as well as sporty elements, such as leather parkas, elastic belts and hoodies trimmed with crystals worn as accessories.

The same mood continued in the lineup, which included shades of yellow, blue mixed with red — for example on a leather bomber with a tropical intarsia — as well as burgundy and black. A leopard pattern was splashed on a trenchcoat layered with transparent black silk and a cute top with a Peter Pan collar matched with an embroidered see-through pencil skirt.

But despite all the different styles, the nude and pink outfits represented the heart of the collection — and enabled Dell’Acqua to affirm: “I’m back.”

By  on September 20, 2017
No. 21 RTW Spring 2018

Sometimes it’s just a matter of time. “I’m finally out of the mourning period,” said Alessandro Dell’Acqua referring to the loss of his namesake brand in 2009. With this beautiful spring collection, Dell’Acqua celebrated the signature codes of his style, which for a few seasons since the launch of No. 21 in 2010, he preferred to keep locked in a drawer rather than infusing in his new upper contemporary line.“I cited myself,” he said, pointing at the picture of a 1996’s runway look — a see-through striped slipdress, which he actually reproduced for this collection.But the designer did more than reedit old clothes. He injected new, fresh energy in his signature sensual, feminine look, focused on lingerie-inspired silhouettes, delicate colors and a touch of sparkling glamour. The show opened with a group of 21 outfits, worked in different shades of nude and pink. They included slipdresses, draped frocks and straight skirts all crafted from ethereal fabrics, including organza, tulle and lace, which were embellished with tonal shiny sequins and feather accents.Focusing on transparencies, Dell’Acqua showed a soft hand when played with layering, making everything look chic and elegant. The overall apparent fragility was balanced by the introduction of soft knitted cardigans and sweaters with a cozy feel, as well as sporty elements, such as leather parkas, elastic belts and hoodies trimmed with crystals worn as accessories.The same mood continued in the lineup, which included shades of yellow, blue mixed with red — for example on a leather bomber with a tropical intarsia — as well as burgundy and black. A leopard pattern was splashed on a trenchcoat layered with transparent black silk and a cute top with a Peter Pan collar matched with an embroidered see-through pencil skirt.But despite all the different styles, the nude and pink outfits represented the heart of the collection — and enabled Dell’Acqua to affirm: “I’m back.”

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